Hoodwinked

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ImageAn Economic Hit Man Reveals Why the World Financial Markets Imploded–and What We Need to Do to Remake Them by John Perkins (2009)

After reading this book, you will have another perspective that once a company or individual has lots and lots of money, there is a lot of things that can be done, which includes hiring a band of thugs to disrupt a country, forcing a government to be overthrown.

Former economic hit man John Perkins has experienced today’s economic collapse before. The banking industry and sub-prime mortgage fiascos, the rising tide of unemployment, and the shuttering of businesses are all too familiar in the Third World countries where he worked. He was both an observer and a perpetrator of events that have now sent the US – in fact the entire planet – spiraling toward disaster. The real cause of our global financial meltdown is what Perkins calls predatory capitalism – the mutant form of an economic system that encourages widespread exploitation of the few to benefit a small number of already very wealthy people.

Here, Perkins pulls back the curtain on the real cause of the current global financial meltdown. He shows how we’ve been hoodwinked by the CEOs who run the corporatocracy—those few corporations that control the vast amounts of capital, land, and resources around the globe—and the politicians they manipulate. These corporate fat cats, Perkins explains, have sold us all on what he calls predatory capitalism, a misguided form of geopolitics and capitalism that encourages a widespread exploitation of the many to benefit a small number of the already very wealthy. Their arrogance, gluttony, and mismanagement have brought us to this perilous edge. The solution is not a “return to normal.” But that each and every of us can do our part to boycott the company and in turn force them to correct their actions.

John Perkins met another senior colleague Ms Claudine Martin who showed him some ropes into their profession.

Unfolding a map, she described Iran as a crucial piece on the Cold War chessboard. “The country’s loaded with oil, but…,” she pointed at the map, “even more important, look at its immediate neighbours : the Soviet Union, Turkey, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan and Pakistan. Besides that, whoever controls Iran rules the Persian Gulf – Arabian Gulf if you speak Arabic – and can easily attack Israel, Lebanon, Jordan and Syria with missles,”  She went on to say that in the 1951 democratic elections for prime minister, Iranians choose Mohammed Mossadegh (Time magazine’s Man of the Year” in 1951), a prominent parliamentarian who promised to force foreign oil companies to share more of their profits with the Iranian people, or face expropriation. “He honoured his campaign promise. ” She refolded the map. “The bastard nationalized Iran’s petroleum assets.” Then she grinned. “And incurred the wrath of British and US intelligence. A big mistake.”

After Mossadegh nationalized oil, the CIA”s director, Allen Dulles, demanded action. However, because of Iran’s proximity to the USSR, President Eisenhower ruled against risking a nuclear war by launching an invasion. Instead, a CIA agent Kermit Roosevelt was dispatched with millions of dollars. He hired a band of thugs to disrupt the country. Riots and violent demonstrations followed, creating the impression that Mossadegh was both unpopular and inept. In 1953, he was overthrown, imprisoned for a while and then spend the resf of his life under house arrest. The CIA’s choice for a replacement, the pro-oil company, pro-Washington Mohammad Reza Pahlavi was brough in and crowned Shahan Shah (“Kings of Kings”)

 

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